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UGU: Unix Guru Universe - Important Dates - Home : Y2K
Important Dates

The following is compiled from Dr. Ed Yardeni's Economics Network

Is the year 2000 in the 21st Century???
Well, technically, the 21st Century and the new Millennium doesn't start until January 1, 2001. This is because the Gregorian Calendar we use didn't have a "Year 0." However, for most of the people on the planet, the celebration starts Dec 31, 1999.

Y2K Officer's Note:
I obtained the following list of "Key Events" from a Y2K resource group. While some of the dates in this list have no real relevance to personal computers or networking equipment, the list does contain many interesting points to consider incorporating into your Y2K Test Plan. The TIC has not yet independently verified the accuracy of some of the following dates.

November 2, 1997 - Overflow HP/Apollo Domain OS

January 1, 1998 - to ensure that the digits "98" do not trigger a red flag, other program subroutine(s), or cause a processing error

January 1, 1999 - to ensure that the digits "99" do not trigger a red flag, other program subroutine(s), or cause a processing error

FY2000 for business and industry - Depending on the business the FY could start on March 1, 1999, July 1, 1999 or match the government fiscal year of October 1, 1999.

August 22, 1999 Overflow of "end of week" rollovers (e.g. GPS)

September 9, 1999 (9/9/99 or possibly 9999) - to ensure that the digits "99" or "9999" do not trigger a red flag, other program subroutine(s), or cause a processing error

October 1, 1999 - first day of Fiscal Year 2000

January 0, 2000 - to ensure that this date is NOT processed (Some applications do have this problem and counts January 0 as the day before the 1st)

January 1, 2000 - key date in any compliance testing

January 3, 2000 - first full work day in the new year

January 10, 2000 - first 9 character date

February 28, 2000 - to ensure the leap year is being properly accounted for (yes, 2000 IS a leap year!!!)

February 29, 2000 - to ensure the leap year is being properly accounted for

February 30, 2000 - to ensure that this date is NOT processed

February 31, 2000 - to ensure that this date is NOT processed

March 1, 2000 - to ensure date calculations have taken leap year into account

October 10, 2000 - first 10 character date

December 31, 2000 - 366th day of the year

January 1, 2001 - first day in the 21st Century

January 1, 2001 - Overflow for Tandem systems

After January 1, 2002 - to ensure no processing errors occur in backward calculations and processing of dates in the 1980s and 1990s at this point in time

February 29, 2001 - to ensure that this date is NOT processed as a leap year

February 29, 2004 - to ensure that this date is processed as a leap year

January 1, 2010 - Overflow ANSI C Library (Note: This event is alleged to be a valid Y2K problem date. I do not have any additional information on this claim)

September 30, 2034 - Overflow of Unix time function

January 1, 2037 - Rollover date for NTP systems

January 19, 2038 - Overflow of Unix systems

September 18, 2042 - Overflow of IBM System/360

February 28, 2100 - last day of February - NOT a leap year. (Our grandkids will deal with this not us).

 
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